The Apes eventually revolted… so would 75% of the workforce given the opportunity.

by Jo Dawson on 8 September 2011 · 1 comment

I went to the cinema last night to watch the latest blockbuster ‘Rise of the Planet of the Apes’. Overall it was an entertaining and enjoyable movie and essential to view on the big screen in my opinion, for those thinking about waiting until it comes out on DVD. This movie not only left me wanting a little Caesar chimpanzee of my own(highly irresponsible I know) but it also left me with food for thought on what is possible when a group of individuals(Apes in this case) decide enough really is enough. This was the ultimate in uprising which led to total chaos.

Don’t be fooled though into thinking, that this kind of revolt can only happen when you lock up and mistreat a large number of chimpanzees in a hostile environment, day in and day out. In this precarious economy we find ourselves in, where companies are having to cut costs and yet still boost productivity, not only are employees often having to work longer hours, but frequently this is being done with little or no pay rise. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to recognise the parallels between the angry chimpanzees portrayed in the movie, and a disgruntled workforce that can be found in many a company worldwide.

According the Wall Street Journal, the Corporate Executive Board has reported that more than 75% of departing employees wouldn’t recommend their employer? Even more frightening is that this figure is almost double what it was 3 years ago. Its not all bad though, as the Sunday Times Top 100 Companies to Work for list proves. Nando’s, the restaurant chain specialising in peri-peri chicken debuted in at the top spot this year with employees raving about the company giving an average score of 80% across the board, with a general consensus that the employees are listened to, irrelevant of which position they held in the company.

Unfortunately, not every company is a Nando’s. There’s no doubt that it’s harder than ever to keep a business afloat in these lean times that we live in. However, a report like this should be a wake up call to any CEO or top level manager to head on back down to the floor and talk to the workforce. If there are any grumblings or ripples of dissent, and you can bet your bottom dollar there will be, hiding behind your desk and sticking your head in the sand like an ostrich isn’t going to keep your company out of that shocking 75% bracket. Too many staff to talk to and not enough spare time to tackle the issues personally? That’s where engagement surveys come in. A well set up survey of this type is designed to provide good honest feedback from your workforce. Listen to what they have to say, and be seen to act on the issues that arise. Being part of that 75% majority, is not a good place to be.

Article by Jo Dawson

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Derek Irvine, Globoforce 10 September 2011 at 4:57 pm

Brilliant and important post, Jo. Just yesterday I wrote about global research from Lumesse that found: Employees may like their company, work and co-workers, but they have little sense of the value of what they do within the “big picture” and they know they have more to offer. So these solid, reliable workers are hoping to move to a new organization that will (1) put their skills to better use and (2) give the employees the feedback they need.

This challenge could be easily overcome by incorporating strategic recognition into performance management strategies. This approach of social performance management clearly and frequently communicates to employees:
* What it is the company needs them to do (strategic objectives/the “big picture”)
* The way in which the company wants the employee to do it (the company values)
* The feedback employees need in the form of frequent recognition from peers and colleagues alike for a true 360°, 365-day-a-year performance review.

Links to the Lumesse research and other related information links are available in this post:
http://www.recognizethisblog.com/2011/09/should-i-stay-or-should-i-go/

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: